Showing posts with label Matthew Martin. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Matthew Martin. Show all posts

Oct 9, 2020

Album Review / Great Peacock / Forever Worse Better


 By Matthew Martin


On Great Peacock's third outing, Forever Worse Better, they have finally created what they've been looking to create for the past few years. This is revitalized Heartland Rock. The band is tighter on this release. Everything seems to be in sync, making for a hell of an album.


The album is a much more personal effort for Andrew Nelson who has described some of the self-doubt and relationship failures that were the muses for some of the better songs on the album (and the best of GP's career). With songs like, "Heavy Load" and "All I Ever Do" there is a clear growth in songwriting both lyrically and musically. It takes a lot to be able to put to words the emotions that come with those feelings and relationships that just always seem to be pulling us down. 


But nowhere on the album is the clear growth of Great Peacock more evident as "High Wind." This is the standout song on the album for me, and quite frankly, I think this is the best song of their catalog (subject to change). From the opening kickstart of the drums to the chugging of the guitars, musically this song is a barnburner. I hear it and immediately feel like I'm hearing my favorite Petty song but not a cheap imitation. And the lyrics are a perfect encapsulation of the album. On this singular song, Andrew laments not only his aging but also his relationship problems. But, there's hope in the song. You know we all have these problems, but the most important part is doing the most while you can. Live it up. In these weird, covid fever dream times, it's a song that feels so pertinent.





The album is full of these songs- "Rock of Ages" and "Learning to Say Goodbye" are beautiful, meaningful, and triumphant. These songs are a testament to the band and their ability to have taken these songs out on the road and truly fine-tune their sound. The soft songs are sonically textured in a great way. The rockers are there. And, the intertwining of Andrew and Blount Floyd's guitars and voices is something to behold. Frank Keith's basslines are tight and keep everything together. This is a group hitting their stride, finding their voice as a band, and hopefully they have a lot more left in them.


Go buy the album and support Great Peacock any way you can.


———


Forever Worse Better is available today on Bandcamp, Amazon Music, etc. 


Jul 9, 2020

Album Review / Joshua Ray Walker / Glad You Made It

By Matthew Martin

We all have those things that bring us comfort. When we are feeling a little out of sorts or we are at a crossroads of any kind, we know exactly what to reach for to bring us a little joy or a little comfort at our most insecure moments. For me, as is the case for many people, that comfort has always been music. The kind I tend to gravitate towards when I'm feeling unsure of my reality usually is played in a minor key. But, whether or not it's in a minor key, I want the lyrics to hit home for me. I want to feel like I've been in the songwriter's position before, or know someone who has, or might be on track to be there at some point. I want to feel it.

Joshua Ray Walker has a knack for this type of song. He has a way with words that I can't get enough of. There's humor, sadness, and a sense of joy in his music- sometimes in the same song. On his last album, Wish You Were Here, it felt like lightning in a bottle. Starting off an album with a song as good as "Canyon" seems criminal. To come out of seemingly nowhere and be that devastating in a song had me hooked and wanting more. I devoured that album and became a big, big fan of Joshua Ray Walker's. I did not want to have to wait the typical 2 or so years to have to hear new music from Walker. And thank god I didn't have to wait that long. 

Released a year and a half later, Joshua Ray Walker's Glad You Made It picks up right where his last album left off. These songs stand up right up there with the best of his debut. Those characters are still deeply flawed, deeply unapologetic, and deeply vibrant. They are covering up scars and bruises, They are wondering how the hell they got where they are. But, again, most of all, they are trying to stay alive, like REALLY ALIVE, for one more night.

One thing that stuck out to me about this album is that it is definitely a more rocking, honky-tonking affair, e.g. "User". This album feels like a twisted 70s Capricorn Records cousin (for those that don't know, Capricorn was home to The Dixie Dregs, Marshall Tucker Band, and The Allman Brothers). The cast of musicians playing on this album very clearly were having a fun time. It shows in every song. From the organ-laced rocker of "D.B. Cooper" to the nearly bluegrass "Play You A Song" every song is loose and perfect sounding. The notes intertwine with Walker's interesting, unique twang. Speaking of his twang, I'm not sure there's a voice as unique as Walker's, complete with his falsetto notes and yodeling. And, I absolutely love it.


Where Walker really shines is when he slows it down to explore some demons- whether or not they're his own is not all that explicit. On "Voices" Walker explores lost love, hurt, and deep depression, even pondering his own death. It's an affecting song. It's dark. But, it's incredible. It's required listening. Yeah, it's sad, but music is supposed to make you feel. It's supposed to make you confront some of those demons you've been neglecting so you can become a better person. At least, that's what I like about music. Then there's "Boat Show Girl" which has that humor that I mentioned earlier, with the imagery of a "redneck Statue of Liberty." This is a character study that Jonny Corndawg/Fritz would be proud of. 

I can't wait until we can see live music again, because I know these songs are going to be absolute killers live. This album is going to be in deep, deep rotation for me. It should be for you. Go buy this album and Walker's first album. You won't regret it.

———
Glad You Made It is available Friday everywhere.

Oct 25, 2019

Album Review / Ottoman Turks (s/t)


By Matthew Martin

Ever wondered what it would sound like if Iggy Pop and the Stooges had been born south of the Mason-Dixon line?  Well, look no further than Fort Worth, Texas's Ottoman Turks.  With a sound as much garage rock as it is country, this seems like that kind of band that could win over the staunchest of Dads who don't "get" their kids' taste in music.  From the apathetic Southern drawl to the snaking slide guitar and driving drum beats, this is definitely music for Saturday nights.

The Ottoman Turks first came to my attention due to some posts by their guitarist who happens to be the incomparable Joshua Ray Walker.  The band had been playing on and off together for the last few years but due to a few conflicting schedules never really did anything more than play a few shows whenever they got back together.  However, in the last year or so they decided to finally get this album out there.  And for that, I couldn't be happier.

The album starts with the perfectly named and played, "Apathy."  With the slide guitar slinking around the whole song, it's hard not to feel entranced.  It's the kind of song you want to open up a beer and just let it wash over you.  The album then breaks into my personal favorites- "Snake Song" and "Glass Bottles."  These are perfect encapsulations of the Ottoman Turks.  You can hear the party in the songs and you can hear the slight danger.  But, you can also sense that note of that sadness that makes country music so endearing and relatable.  


Then there's the almost pure garage rock "OCP."  A song about fighting.  A song definitely more at home on Funhouse than Ol Waylon but feels so uniquely Ottoman Turks.  This song even has a pretty sweet drum solo.  What's not to love?!  Seriously, the last half of this album is one long party.  It's worth the price of admission.

The whole album more or less bleeds into each other almost feeling like one long live set. It's a production technique that I am quite fond of. For a band with one album, I feel they have pretty distinct sound.  If I were to turn on the radio and hear more garage rock country, I'd immediately assume it was Ottoman Turks.  I can only guess what these songs would sound like live.  I imagine the smell of sweat, booze, and cigarettes.  I imagine dancing and all around rowdiness.  But, most of all, I imagine an awesome time.  I hope these dudes make it up to D.C. sometime.  And, if you live in the Fort Worth area, you oughta go see em.  Until then, go get the album and crank that shit up loud.

Ottoman Turks is available on Amazon, Apple Music, etc.

Aug 19, 2019

Album Review / Tyler Childers / Country Squire

By Matthew Martin

A few months ago, Tyler Childers released the first single ("House Fire") from his upcoming album Country Squire along with the trippy cover art.  It was perfect, in my mind.  I loved everything about the song- from the simple, understated start to the whirring, fuzzed-out ending.  I knew this was going to be an album every bit as good as his previous album (Purgatory). 

But then I heard the next single- "All Your’n”- and my excitement dipped a bit.  It seemed decidedly not Tyler Childers.  I wasn't sure what to think of the upcoming album after that song.  Here we have a raucous first single with some crazy artwork followed by a nice, but not all that exciting follow-up single.  But, I was hoping that my instincts were wrong; that it would all make sense in the context of the album.  I mean, Sturgill was a producer for the album and he's got a pretty good track record.  

Then the album came out.  And, let me tell you something, it's everything I wanted from a Tyler Childer release.  It's fiery.  It's full of innuendo.  It's sweet.  It's 100% pure-Tyler Childers.  The difference we have here is that he's taken on a bit of that Sturgill-like tendency to make a compelling, complete song-cycle.  While not every song is thematically related, the songs are all tethered together with no real beginning or end to each; only the fade out into the next song.  

While it is one cohesive album, there are clear standouts to me on this album.  "Country Squire," "Bus Route," "Gemini," and "House Fire" being my favorites as of right now.  "Bus Route" takes me back to my days growing up in rural Tennessee where I also had a bus driver who didn't put up with shit (Mr. Morris was scarier than hell).  "House Fire" has gotten a little backlash because of the mix, but I think the mix is just about damn perfect.  The only time I think his voice fades a bit is in the second half of the song when all of the instruments are all blending and weaving in and out of each other.  I think of his voice as an extension of the instruments and it works incredibly well.  My wife, after listening to "House Fire" for the second or third time looked at me and said, "This song feels like it's always been around."  That's it.  That's the perfect song.  Timeless and new all at once.


Even when you get to "Ever Lovin' Hand" (you know, the song about self-love), you might giggle at the first or second listen, but then you realize that it is actually pretty sweet.  I dunno, maybe I'm just a sucker for a sweet song, but this one got to me.  If you would have told me Tyler Childers would make a song about masturbation that I'd tell you was sweet, I would have laughed in your face.  But, that's the genius in Childers.  He approaches these topics with humility and humor.  He doesn't try to make fun of anything, it seems.  These are things that happen day in and day out, and as they say, ahem, write what you know.  And as for "All Your'n" I dig it now.  It works totally within the album.  I wouldn't change a damn thing about it or the album.  I apologize profusely for doubting this song.  


Last time I saw Tyler Childers, he was in a small venue up here in D.C. called Rock and Roll Hotel.  It holds around 400 folks.  When he comes back in December, he'll be playing at The Anthem.  It holds 6,000 people and it's already sold out (I'm bummed that I missed out on getting tickets to this one...).  Tyler Childers is here and everyone has caught on to his genius.  His new album is a continuation of everything we've grown to love about the Kentucky redhead.  But, there’s also growth.  He tried something new on this album, and damn, it worked.  I'm already dying for more new music.  Go buy everything you can from Childers and go see his incredible band live.  You won't be disappointed.

Aug 16, 2019

Live Review / Ward Davis & Charles Wesley Godwin / Pearl Street Warehouse 8/9/19


By Matthew Martin

To be honest, I had only really just heard of Ward Davis.  I knew that he was a helluva songwriter and was always being lauded by Cody Jinks.  I knew that he was a co-writer of one of my favorite Jinks songs, "I'm Not The Devil."  But, I wasn't really familiar with his music.  But, when I saw that the incredible Charles Wesley Godwin was going to be opening up for him, I knew I was going to go.  Then, they switched up the show and made it a free show.  That made it even better.  So, we got some friends together and went to Pearl Street Warehouse in D.C.'s newly updated Wharf area.  

To start the evening, Ward Davis's bassist (whose name I did not write down and cannot remember for the life of me) started with a few songs.  Here I will admit that I could not hear the songs that well.  The acoustics this evening at Pearl Street Warehouse left much to be desired.  There was an open window in the back which may have resulted in the solo musician being drowned out by the voices inside and outside of the bar.  The songs were fine enough, but I just couldn't hear them well enough to have a strong opinion one way or the other.

Next, Charles Wesley Godwin was up and while the mix was also still a little messed up in the bar, the songs still stood out.  I know I mentioned this before, but I think CWG is special.  I think this debut solo album is special.  I think the stories CWG tells of West Virginia are important for everyone to hear.  We hear country songs about beer, women, and backroads enough.  We don't hear what it's like for real, honest country folks living their lives through the ups and downs of wars and energy industry downturns.  That being said, I did have the advantage to lots of folks (but, not all, for sure) in that I knew most of the songs and was able to make the sounds I couldn't quite hear out in my head.  This was nothing against CWG, mind you.  He sang his heart out, he played his heart out.  It's just the sound at the venue was very much off this night for a solo act.  However, that didn't stop folks from loving what they were hearing.  Some who were talking quite loudly during the first act shut up immediately to try and strain and hear every word coming from the stage.  I found out shortly after that there were a few people who had driven 3 hours to come see CWG open for Ward Davis.  That is special, y'all.  I remember hearing stories like that about American Aquarium.  CWG has struck a chord and his momentum will continue to grow.

Finally, Ward Davis was up.  He's a heavy-hitter.  He's pure country gold.  He's honky tonk.  He's everything I wanted to hear.  He started the night off on his trusty telecaster, slinging out classics like "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way" to his collaboration with Cody Jinks "I'm Not The Devil."  His band was tight.  The sound that was plaguing the first two acts didn't quite plague Davis as the band was able to drown out a lot of the chatter and really wash over folks.  Speaking of the band, the guitarist was great.  He hit every note like a seasoned veteran and he looked like he couldn't be a day over 21.  Midway through the set Davis switched over to his piano and played some more introspective tunes which included his songs from his latest EP Asunder.  The sincerity and simplicity with which Davis tells a story is stunning.  The range he has as a musician- storytelling-wise, I mean- is something to behold.  He can throw down shit-kicking boot-stompers or he can lay down beautiful heartbreaking tunes about divorce.  Not to mention, he can cover a song like "Time To Move On" by Tom Petty and make it sound like it's his own song.  He was impressive by all measures.  I was disappointed to know that he only has 1 full album and 1 EP out there.  I want, no need, more music from Ward Davis.  His peers (Jinks, Whitey Morgan) are putting out incredible music at a breakneck pace these days.  He can add to that and bring his own unique sound and style to the table.

As always, if you see these folks coming anywhere near you, go see them.  Go give em a hug.  Go buy anything and everything you can from them.  They are making music that deserves to be heard and they deserve every ounce of success they get from their hard work.  


(Not from the Pearl Street Warehouse show)

Apr 29, 2019

Album Review / Caroline Spence / Mint Condition

By Matthew Martin

I remember the first time I heard Caroline Spence.  She was opening for John Moreland at Jammin' Java in Vienna, VA.  I was expecting to be blown away by Moreland, but was yet again extremely happy I got there for the opener.  Caroline Spence opened and completely blew me away.  I left feeling gut-punched, not only by Moreland, but by Spence.  She sang incredible songs with a wonderful, strong voice.

On Spence's latest album, Mint Condition, she continues her strong streak of albums.  There are songs for every mood and occasion, but one thing remains constant; Spence's perfect songwriting ability.  The production on the album is also great.  It allows Spence's voice and lyrics to be the star of the show.  There isn't much flair in terms of added instruments or needless solos.  Sure, they're there, but they add flavor rather than a distraction.

As for the songs themselves, I think these are some of Spence's greatest.  She deals with trying to get out of town to turn your life around ("Angels or Los Angeles").  Or, she sings about the insecurity that comes with relationships and growing up ("Who Are You" and "Song About A City").  My favorite song on the album, "Sit Here and Love Me,” is at once crushing and beautiful.  This perfect song about dealing with depression and the need to just have a loving ear and it caught my attention immediately; I continue to go back to it more and more.  Sometimes the solution to any problem is to just love and be loved.  It's beautiful and I hope if nothing else, you listen to this song intently.


Spence can also write a damn good, clever line with the best of em.  On the great "Who's Gonna Make My Mistakes" Spence muses, "Talking to this man is like looking at an ashtray, something was there but there ain't much left..."  Lines like that are strewn throughout the album here and there.  You gotta pay attention and with Spence's voice, that isn't hard to do.  She demands attention.  She deserves your attention.  Come for the voice, stay for the songwriting.

The album finishes with the title track, "Mint Condition."  This song is a great representation of all that is Caroline Spence.  At once beautiful, clever, and graceful, the song is a perfect way to end the album.  Spence can write the hell out of a love song.

I think Spence is one of the songwriters we don't hear nearly enough about.  She consistently puts out great albums and this album is no different.  Go buy it.  You won't be disappointed.  Go see her when she comes near your town.  She's worth every damn cent.  I know I can't wait til she comes to D.C. so I can hear these brand new songs live.

—————

Mint Condition is available Friday.


Mar 26, 2019

Live Review / Charles Wesley Godwin / The Vinyl Lounge / 3/14/19



By Matthew Martin

West Virginia ends up being the butt of a lot of jokes. There's poverty.  There's wide-reported drug abuse.  And there's a sense of this almost pride that you're NOT from West Virginia.  But, on the other side of that coin are the people from West Virginia.  If you actually meet folks from West Virginia, they're nothing like those silly caricatures you read/hear/joke about.  They're proud.  They're proud of what the state stood for during the Civil War. They're proud of what the state provided to the country with the mining industry.  They're proud of the unions that began in that same mining industry.  And over the years some of the best Appalachian music has come out of those hills and hollers.

Charles Wesley Godwin is someone I believe will become a household name very soon.  There's nothing but authenticity dripping from every word and chord that pours out of him.  And he has the voice to carry these sincere, heartfelt songs of growing up in West Virginia.  Songs that are so specific to the Appalachian region that you almost feel you're there as you listen to him sing.  This all comes through on his fantastic debut album Seneca.  I was pleased to find out that in a stripped-down, solo live show, nothing was lost.

We went to see Charles at The Vinyl Lounge which is part of the Gypsy Sally's venue in D.C.  We had once seen Sturgill Simpson play solo at this place to about 50 people.  So, this felt similar- like I needed to see Charles Wesley Godwin before he started making it to venues where the crowds were growing.  He began the show around 10PM.  

The first couple of songs were new songs as far as I was concerned ("Jesse" and "Bones").  I don't believe they were from his previous band, either.  These songs were incredibly well-written and true to CWG's young, but quite impressive career.  CWG would then go on to play a great mix of songs from his debut album ("Coal Country", "Strawberry Queen", and "Shrinks and Pills") as well as songs from his previous band's (Union Sound Treaty) output ("Peaked" and "Hazelton").  He threw in a couple of covers as well from folks like Bruce Springsteen and Jimmy Martin.

CWG played for those of us there for around an hour and a half.  It was an intimate affair and one that I am incredibly glad I got to witness.  The songs of CWG are smart and emotional.  West Virginia pride is rich in the tradition of the songs.  He wants you to know that WV is still here.  With songs like "Here In Eden" he calls his WV brothers to arms.  You get the idea that CWG would never apologize for where he's from.  And, that's what makes his songs so relatable and so damn irresistible.  We all want that sense of pride of our home.  CWG has it damn spades.

To drive this point home, CWG pulled a barstool out from the bar for his last song.  He stepped away from his mic.  He unplugged his guitar.  And he sang with all of his heart and soul the WV standard: "Country Roads".  We all sang along.  We felt connected.  And, we walked away from the show feeling like we'd just watched something pretty special.

If you are anywhere near CWG, go see him.  It is special.  He's building something.  He will be someone we all will say we remember when he was still building that something.  Until he comes to your place, go buy his music; his solo album and his previous band's album.  You won't be disappointed. 




Jan 16, 2019

Live Review / Ryan Culwell / Hill Country DC

by Matthew Martin

Something that really grabbed me about Ryan Culwell's latest album, The Last American, was his voice.  His voice and phrasing are unique and the range is pretty impressive.  So, when I saw Culwell was going to be at Hill Country here in Washington, D.C. for a solo show, on January 10th, I knew I had to round up the troops and go.  The best thing about these solo shows is it allows the words and the voice of the artist to really stand out.  That's exactly what happened.

Culwell sang most of the songs off of his new album, but also sang quite a few from his last album Flatlands.  I had listened to the Flatlands album prior to seeing this show, but there was something about seeing those stark songs in that setting that made them hit much harder.  When he sang songs such as "Never Gonna Cry" and "Red River," the crowd was hushed and listening with the same intensity as Culwell was singing. 

Of course, every show has 1 or 2 of those people that won't quite read the room around them.  And, this show was no different...  Two women sat two rows from Culwell and talked, laughed, and generally disrupted the show for those around them.  Most of it was overlooked.  Until in the middle of a washed-out, quiet song Culwell stopped playing until the two women got the point and decided to take their talents elsewhere.  This was met with cheers and applause from the whole room.  My wife was about to lose her cool, so I was glad Culwell dealt with it so graciously.

With that out of the way, the crowd could once again focus on the songs.  The remaining night, Culwell had everyone under his spell going from sweet songs ("Moon Hangs Down") and heartbreakers ("Dog's Ass") to blues numbers ("Dig A Hole").  Ryan easily commands attention while on stage.  Even when he's singing the saddest, quietest songs, you strain to make sure you catch every single word sung.  It was very clear that Ryan is comfortable in that space and knows how to work his voice with ease.  Adding some reverb to wash out his vocals was a great way to fill out the songs, as well.  

(different show, obviously)

With all that said, there were a few moments in the show that hit me incredibly hard; one of which was the song "Won't Come Home". The song is about traveling/leaving home and the fact that sometimes it's hard to come home again because your experiences have broadened.  What you think you knew is no longer what you know.  Not that you know any more or any less.  It's just that you have a very different perception of what life, and home, is.  That one got me down in my soul.  I remember thinking that my mom would sob uncontrollably the moment she ever hears that song.  What a song.  What a night.  The night ended on the standout track "Can You Hear Me" from his latest album.  With that, Culwell walked off stage and met the many fans that came out to hear him.  

If you get a chance to see Ryan Culwell soon, do it.  Doesn't matter if he's opening for someone, headlining, with a band, or solo.  This guy is the real deal.  He's out there slinging authentic, honest songs and deserves every ounce of our attention and the accolades he's been receiving.  I highly recommend his latest album as a starting point.  It's lyrically strong and the music is a perfect amalgamation of what makes Ryan Culwell so great.  But, don't sleep on his 2015 release Flatlands. When you go see him (or hell before, so you'll know all the songs), buy one or both of those albums.  You won't regret it.


Jan 2, 2019

Matthew's Top 10 Albums of 2018


by Matthew Martin

----------


1- Brandi Carlile - By The Way, I Forgive You
Brandi Carlile's album this year was by far and away the album I listened to the most and the one that had the most emotional punch.  Brandi's voice is perfectly suited to the songs of heartbreak, being a new mother, and being a touring musician.  The production is immaculate and if Hold Out Your Hand doesn't get you moving, you're clearly a lost hope. This is a perfect, timeless album.


2- American Aquarium - Things Change
When BJ lost his band a couple of years ago due to whatever reasons, I thought the American Aquarium name would be retired.  Instead, BJ found a new backing band and came back stronger than ever.  These are some BJ's strongest songs he's written since Burn. Flicker. Die. And, the band!  I'll be damned if this band doesn't seem even tighter.  When BJ has been at his lowest point, band-wise, he's given us masterpieces and this album is no exception.  


3- Lucero - Among The Ghosts
To follow Lucero's career has been an amazing transition from country/punk 4 piece to a straight-up Memphis rock and roll band complete with a horns section.  For their 9th (or 10th if you count The Attic Tapes) studio album, the guys took it back to their roots and left the horns out for the most part.  What they gave us was their best album since 1372 Overton Park.  It's a musically concise album cutting away any fat and letting the songs and band speak for themselves.  Ben Nichols has written some of his most interesting songs to date about Civil War battles, touring, and shoot-outs.  In a catalog full of incredible albums, this one is certainly at the top.


4- Cody Jinks - Lifers
I remember when I first heard Cody Jinks a few years ago, I wasn't immediately a fan.  I don't remember what made me think that- maybe just wasn't in the right headspace or something.  But, that has completely changed.  Jinks released the album that will likely (and seems to already have) boost him to the ranks of Simpson or, potentially even Stapleton.  Jinks's voice is velvety smooth and his band is right on the mark.  The songs are a perfect mix of hard-life livers, hard-night havers, and hard-love lovers.  It's incredibly relatable to those listening and it's the kind of tunes we've come to expect out of Jinks over the last few years.  Yet another very good album in Jinks's short, but incredibly respectable output.


5- Ryan Culwell - The Last American
This album hit me harder than any other album on this list.  Just by sheer surprise and being completely blown away by Culwell's voice and music composition.  This is the album it takes folks quite a few albums into their career to get to.  But, this is Culwell's 3rd.  And it's a masterpiece.  The songs are barnburners and gut-wrenchers.  It's a perfect mix.  This is perfect Southern American music.  It sounds like Tom Petty channeling Mark Knopfler.  There's going to be a lot to hear from Culwell in the future, so I definitely suggest you go ahead and hop on the bandwagon now. 


6- Great Peacock - Gran Pavo Real
I've been a fan of Great Peacock for a few years now and after their last album, I was excited to see where they would go.  As I would go to shows over the next few years, it became clear they were going to go in a more electric direction.  And, they absolutely did.  This album is a rocker full of the harmonies and introspective lyrics you've come to expect.  This is the one you reach for on Saturday night around midnight.  


7- Caleb Caudle - Crushed Coins
Caudle has been pumping out perfect country songs for a while now.  On Crushed Coins, Caudle hit his full stride.  The songs are his best set of songs he's put out.  The music and production are absolutely perfectly suited for his voice and his songs.  NYC In The Rain is a perfect song and a perfect Caleb Caudle song.  I don't think there's anyone else I can imagine singing this song other than Caudle.  If you haven't checked out Caudle, this album is the one to start with.  It's Caudle at his best.


8- Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears - The Difference Between Me and You
Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears have been making music for over 10 years now and let me tell you, they haven't lost a step.  If anything the music has grown more electric, more biting, and louder.  2018 Black Joe Lewis is still writing those 2008 funky party songs, but now he's writing songs about issues he sees going on in this country.  If you like The Stooges, James Brown, and pissed off Steve Earle, this is the album for you.


9- The Pollies - Transmissions
I'm a sucker for any album The Pollies put out.  In my mind, they're one of the best bands out there and it's a complete shame that more people don't know them.  On Transmissions, The Pollies have written a perfect set of Southern pop rock songs.  It's hard not to bob your head along to these songs.  If you've been looking for our generations answer to Big Star, you have no need to look any further.  Keep an eye on The Pollies and do yourself a favor and buy this album.



10- Whitey Morgan and the .78s - Hard Times and White Lines
When it comes to straight-up, hard-edged country, there's not a single person doing it better than Whitey Morgan.  He and his band have again written a damn incredible country album.  You can always bet the bank on Morgan to only release the best of the best.  You will not get filler or cheap songs.  You're going to get songs about living out on the road, the things that does to relationships, and ways to pass the time when out on the road.  It ain't a pretty life, but when Morgan sings about it, it sure makes you wanna try it out for a while.

Oct 9, 2018

Album Review / The Pollies / Transmissions

by Matthew Martin

The Pollies have had a busy, if somewhat quiet career since their debut came out in 2012.  They've released 1 other full-length album, have backed Chris Porter on an EP, and have, of late, been backing Dylan LeBlanc around the US and Europe.  In that time they have stretched their musical muscles and expanded the sounds that made their first two albums so intriguing.  Now, they have released the retro, but positively modern, new album Transmissions.

With pulsing synths opening up the album, the Pollies let you know that a band from a place with rich musical history (Muscle Shoals, AL) can still shatter what it means to be a Southern band.  While decidedly Southern sounding on most of the album, there are moments of freakouts such as the midway point and end of "Knocking At My Door."  These are well-served and welcomed additions to these songs, adding a layer of intrigue to the perfectly crafted pop songs on the album.  (To be fair, I've always been a fan of any sort of freakout moment on an album, so maybe I'm just biased.)

Jay Burgess and crew have started to hone their hook skills with beautiful rock songs like "Love's To Fault" and "Hold On My Heart."  Burgess's voice is perfect to carry across these songs of loving and longing.  You know how Lindsay Buckingham is the only person who could ever sing "Tusk?"  Burgess's voice just ties all of these songs together with his raspy, wistful voice.  Listen to "Lonely" and try to not be moved.  


At their core, The Pollies have always been a pop rock band with tendencies to stretch out songs.  Southern pop rock has always been a rather unglorified but important genre.  Bands like Big Star put Southern pop rock on the map, but there are a number of bands emulating that style today (one other that comes to mind is Belle Adair out of AL, as well).  The Pollies are carrying that torch and making that sound all their own.  

If I had one complaint, I would say that I almost wish "You Want It" was a bit muted on the synths.  It's an interesting inclusion, and I almost like the addition.  But, it gets to be a bit glaring and doesn't quite fit in with the rest of the album.  The rest of the songs are incredibly well thought out and balanced.  "You Want It" misses that mark, for me.  

Still, Transmissions is worth the price of admission.  You won't be disappointed with the contents.  This is an album of perfect summer tunes- almost wish I had the whole summer back to enjoy this one with the windows down or out on the river.  In a different life, The Pollies would be getting their due on the radio, but that is not the world we live in.  Instead, you should go out, buy this and every other Pollies album, and share or buy one for your friends/family.  

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Transmissions is available on Bandcamp, Amazon, Spotify, etc. 


Sep 26, 2018

Matthew Reviews Great Peacock… Playing HIS Wedding Reception

Photo by Darcy Ferris


by Matthew Martin 

I'm going to do something a little unusual here.  I'm going to tell you about one of my favorite days I can ever remember up until this point in my life.  On Saturday, September 15th, I made a pretty big life change.  I married my best friend and it was amazing.  It was in front of a church built in the 1800s with much of its stained glass still intact.  The weather was perfect, if a little hot (but, it's September in TN, what can you expect).  All that was something I could never forget.  But, then we got to the reception and it was the most fun I've had at a wedding (yeah, I know I'm biased) because we did something a little unusual: we got one of our favorite bands to play our wedding.  That band is Great Peacock.

One of the first dates my wife and I went on was to see Great Peacock at Hill Country here in DC.  It was a hell of time back then, and time has done nothing but made Great Peacock better.  One of our concerns with having a band many of our friends had never heard of (not for lack of our trying, I want to add) was whether or not people would be inclined to dance to songs they didn't know.  This turned out to be a ridiculous concern as people were out on the small dance floor we had and the surrounding grass almost immediately.  

When we were talking to the guys in Great Peacock, we made it clear that we didn't want them to be a wedding band, we wanted them to be exactly who they were.  So, if they wanted to play a couple covers, those covers should be songs they wanted to do, not songs we wanted them to do.  Although, I will say that we requested for them to play "Wildflowers" by Tom Petty for our first dance and it was perfect.  

Needless to say, they ripped through their songs at near perfection.  They played songs from their first and second albums, which we love.  They played songs such as "Take Me To The Mountain", "Tennessee" (which my dad specifically requested), "Miss You Honey", and "Let's Just Get Drunk Tonight."  Oh, and on "Let's Just Get Drunk Tonight" the guys let me come up and play harmonica.  Now, I'm not one to usually do something like that because of things like, oh I don't know, over a hundred people looking back at me, but my wife and I talked about it and this was something she really wanted me to do.  I'm glad I did, because the joy it brought my family was special.  

Photo by Darcy Ferris


They ended their night on "Desert Lark", that is, until the 150+ people at the wedding shouted for them to play one more song.  So, they played their always hell-on-wheels version of Whiskeytown's "Hard Luck Story."  It was the perfect cap to the perfect day.   Maybe it was the moonshine my dad was handing out (don't ever question my country bonafides, son), maybe it was the joy of being at a wedding, or maybe it was the perfect backdrop of an old pre-Civil War era cabin, but this was by far my favorite time seeing Great Peacock perform.  

When we had set out to thinking of the reception, we asked ourselves what could possibly make our special day even better.  We kicked around a DJ, we kicked around a bluegrass band, but ultimately we thought we'd share with everyone the band that we both believe in and genuinely love.  Sometimes it's hard to convince people to go to a show of a band they'd maybe only heard of but with busy schedules just never got around to checking out.  So, we wanted to make it easy for them.  And, we also knew that the music would be perfect.  And it was.  We had aunts, uncles, cousins, old friends, new friends, grandmothers, and our parents out there dancing, throwing their hands up, and shouting with reckless abandon.  It was a magical moment and it wouldn’t have been close to being possible without Great Peacock.  They picked up new fans from Dallas, TX to London, UK.

So, on that note, I'll leave this by saying, go see that band your friends have been raving about.  You don't know how much your presence might mean and you might also find your next favorite band.  The guys in Great Peacock make some of the best music out there right now.  I am confident in saying that.  They are tight, they are professional, and they have all the chops you'd want from a band.  And, to top it off, they are genuinely some of the nicest dudes I have met.  I'm glad we got to share this special day with them.  Go see em and go buy their music wherever you buy music.

Photo by Matt DeFina



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Great Peacock's latest album, Gran Pavo Real, is available on Spotify and all the usual locations.

Aug 23, 2018

Lucero: Our Dream Set Lists



~intro by Robert Dean

If there’s a band that deserves to finally break through to the next level, it’s Lucero. They’re the humble road dogs who never quit, and continually deliver the goods. And with Among The Ghosts debuting at #2 on the Billboard Independent Albums chart and the band celebrating 20 years of existence, we wanted to take a minute and gush with pride and love for the best dudes from Memphis. It's about damn time for a Grammy nod for these boys.

Considering a few of us (Trailer, Chad, & Robert) have seen the band live more than they can count on two hands, we wanted to put together dream set lists. Just for funsies, because you know, NERD ALERT. 

The only rules are: 15 songs and an encore (although Lucero routinely plays 20+ songs per show).



Robert Dean’s dream Lucero set: 
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Smoke

Everything Has Changed 
Anjalee
I Can Get us Out of Here 
Among The Ghosts 
Baby Don’t You Want Me
Nights Like These
Drink Till We’re Gone 
Sweet Little Thing 
Hey Darlin’ Do You Gamble 
Texas & Tennessee 
On My Way Downtown
For The Lonely Ones
Raisin’ Hell 
Hate & Jealousy

Encore: 
Tears Don’t Matter Much  

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Jeremy
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Can’t You Hear Them Howl
For the Lonely Ones
The Man I Was
To My Dearest Wife
Darby’s Song

Went Looking For Warren Zevon’s Los Angeles 
Among the Ghosts
Woke Up In New Orleans
Hey Darlin’ Do You Gamble?
They Called Her Killer
All Sewn Up
Texas & Tennessee
Nights Like These
Goodbye Again
All These Love Songs

Encore:
The Closer You Get (Alabama cover)
Tears Don’t Matter Much

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Trailer
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The Mountain

Among the Ghosts
All These Love Songs
Chain Link Fence
Tonight Ain't Gonna Be Good
My Best Girl
Texas & Tennessee
Sweet Little Thing
That Much Further West
Nights Like These
What Else Would You Have Me Be?
Raising Hell
Noon As Dark As Midnight
It Gets the Worst at Night
Kiss the Bottle

Encore:
Smoke
Sixteen
Tears Don't Matter Much

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Kevin
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Downtown (Intro)
On My Way Downtown
Like Lightning
Last Night in Town
The War
She's Just That Kind of Girl
I Can Get Us Out of Here Tonight

Sweet Little Thing
Darby's Song
Johnny Davis
The Devil and Maggie Chascarillo
Smoke
Can't Feel a Thing
What Are You Willing to Lose?
Sounds of the City

Encore: 
The Mountain

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Chad
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For the Lonely Ones
Last Night in Town
Little Silver Heart
To My Dearest Wife
Among the Ghosts
Raising Hell
That Much Further West
Sweet Little Thing
Bottom of the Sea
Sixes & Sevens
All Sewn Up
Texas & Tennessee
Nights Like These
Chain Link Fence
Tears Don't Matter Much

Encore:
San Francisco
Drink Till We're Gone

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Matthew
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Can't You Hear Them Howl
I don't think there would be a better damn way to begin a Lucero show than this opening riff. 
Cover Me
Little Silver Heart
Nights Like These
Watch It Burn
What Else Would You Have Me Be?
I feel confident a show that began with these first 6 songs would absolutely create a frenzied-as-hell crowd.  And, I am all for it.  Let's burn this whole thing down!
Sweet Little Thing
Last Night In Town
This song was played at the first Lucero show (I think) I went to with my Dad and brother back in my home state of TN and it meant a lot at the time to me since I was leaving to come back up to D.C.  I wish it was played every single show I attended.  
Tears Don't Matter Much
Hate & Jealousy
I haven't seen this song or Sing Me No Hymns live before and I have to believe that these would absolutely be scorchers live.
Sing Me No Hymns
That Much Further West
To My Dearest Wife

On My Way Downtown
Sound Of The City

Encore:
The War->Raising Hell
I know I'm cheating here, but I think this would be a killer way to do an encore.  You can't have a Lucero show without The War and Raising Hell is a life affirming way to end my night of Lucero's perfect set list.
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Jun 4, 2018

Album Review / American Aquarium / Things Change

by Matthew Martin

When I heard the news last year that American Aquarium was experiencing a mass exodus of all members except for singer-songwriter BJ Barham, I wondered what form Barham would continue on in.  I knew that he'd continue.  The songwriter in him showed no signs of quit, of having that hard-earned time out on the road be for nothing.  I will admit that I was shocked to hear that the name American Aquarium would continue on with all new members.  But, at the end of the day, Barham's earnest lyrics and dedicated-to-the-craft workmanship is what made American Aquarium truly work.  So, it should be no surprise that the latest output from Barham and new mates is just as impressive as ever.

Barham seems to find that muse of his when his back's against the wall.  When he feels like he's been backed into a corner and the only way to get himself out is to fight like hell.  It's what we saw with 2012's stellar Burn. Flicker. Die.   And now we see it here on Things Change.  I think that muse was burning from both ends of the same candle on this latest output as Barham saw not only the end of his band, but a change in the U.S. that was hard for many to grapple with.

I'll get that political upheaval out of the way first because I think that may turn some folks off.  It shouldn't.  Barham writes from his personal worldview.  You might disagree, but he isn't wrong either.  When he sings of seeing the hate his grandfather fought against being alive and well, it's there.  And, regardless of who won the election of 2016, it was still going to be there.  So, before getting mad at yet another artist who should just "shut up and sing," just listen.  Try understanding that there are folks out there that are worried- on both sides.  We are scared of each other, but we can change that.  Music is one of the things that can, and does, bring us together.  

As far as the other subjects on the album, there is a mighty heavy dose of regret and hope when it comes to losing friends you've had for years.  There's always sadness when you lose someone- whether it be by choice or, god forbid, death.  But, there is always hope and happiness in what that change can bring.  Barham doesn't shirk responsibility for those relationships failing.  He meets them head-on and tries to learn lessons from those failures.  He addresses the man he used to be when he would blame every trouble he had on every woman who did him wrong ("One Day At A Time").  He addresses the booze that always led him astray and towards self-destruction ("I Gave Up The Drinking").  Barham knows he isn't perfect, but his ability to stare his demons in the face with hope is what makes the album so incredibly stunning.  And, that's just the words...


The music on this album is a synthesis of every single American Aquarium album up until now.  There are hard-driving rockers ("Crooked+Straight"), acoustic self-reflective songs ("One Day At A Time"), and straight up country songs ("Work Conquers All").  While the band prior to this iteration was a pretty damn good band, this new band has absolutely crushed any expectations one could have had going into this album.  Barham is the glue holding the band together, sure.  But, the band takes his bare bones songs and kicks them up countless notches.  I don't think Barham could have chosen a better group of musicians for this new era of American Aquarium and I can't wait to hear where this band goes from here.  

So, give these songs a listen.  Take time with them.  Don't get turned off because he says something that might not be what you want to hear.  Hear it from his point of view.  Music is the great equalizer and as always, hope springs eternal.   And don't forget to go see Barham and crew as they come to your town!

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Things Change is available everywhere you enjoy good music.

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