Showing posts with label Charles Wesley Godwin. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Charles Wesley Godwin. Show all posts

Jan 6, 2020

Megan's Top 11 Albums of 2019


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11. Ian Noe — Between the Country

10. Alice Wallace — Into the Blue
This is a great reminder that the "western” in country and western has not been lost; it’s an excellent showcase of the many styles and influences in California and the importance of that state to country’s heritage.

9. Midland — Let it Roll
One of the best, most country mainstream releases we have seen in awhile, exactly what modern Music Row output should look like. The production is flawless, and it’s an example of how polish can sometimes work in a record’s favor.

8. The Steel Woods — Old News
Exhibit A for the fact that Southern rock is still cool and can exist in thrive in 2019. It’s been as marginalized as traditional country, and it’s awesome to see the Steel Woods carrying the torch and doing it so well.

7. Jason Hawk Harris — Love in the Dark
One of the most fascinating records of the year, focusing on the morbid and macabre and managing to do so in a thoroughly accessible and compelling way.

6. Emily Scott Robinson — Traveling Mercies
Not much to say here, just simply a gorgeous collection of songs. Some candidates for the best songwriting of 2019.

5. Michaela Anne — Desert Dove
One of those records where everything just works, from the melodies to the vocals to the sweeping arrangements. Michaela Anne does an excellent job here of setting the wide open spaces of California and Arizona to music.

4. Tyler Childers — Country Squire

3. Shane Smith & the Saints — Hail Mary
Shane Smith & the Saints have finally managed to capture all the beauty of their live show in album form. The best harmonies you will hear on any 2019 release.

2. Charles Wesley Godwin — Seneca
From the lyrics to the vocals to the production, where it sounds as if Godwin recorded the whole album in forgotten mines and on lonely mountainsides, this is a beautiful tribute to his home state of West Virginia.

1. Jade Bird, Self-Titled
Everything comes together on Jade Bird’s debut record, from her incredible vocals to the angst in the writing to the variety in production and mood. An excellent, very re-playable record.

~Megan Bledsoe

Jan 3, 2020

New Video / Charles Wesley Godwin / "Coal Country"

Kevin's Top 10 Albums of 2019




Kevin Broughton’s Top 10 Albums of 2019

I think 2019 was a really good year for songwriting and debut albums. I’d also note some consensus I had with other FTM contributors; seven of my Top 10 made the critics’ Top 10 as well.  And my list falls on a definitive Lone Star-to-Appalachia axis, with four Texans, three Kentuckians and one West Virginian winning accolades. 

1. Dalton Domino – Songs From The Exile

A change of pace, style and life converge in this brilliant follow up to 2017’s Corners. On this album it’s all about the lyrics, and the artist is brutally honest in his self-reflection. The lyrical imagery is reminiscent of Isbell’s Southeastern, and one hopes that sobriety will have a similarly positive impact on Domino’s career going forward. Even if Songs From The Exile is his upper limit, it’s a worthy career-defining effort.

I didn’t cross paths with this album till late in the year, several months after its release. It’s still in heavy rotation.

2. Vandoliers – Forever

Josh Fleming and his rowdy band of Texas rockers had their wish come true when they inked a deal with Bloodshot records, then rewarded the label’s faith in them with this tour de force. It’s an album that combines Fleming’s focused, fiery storytelling with the raw, rough-edged roots you might hear from Lucero or the Old 97s. And oh, the fiddles and horns!

3. Whiskey Myers – self-titled

It’s counterintuitive that this band self-produced a masterpiece after having two great records helmed by all-everything Dave Cobb, but that’s exactly what happened here. There’s depth and balance to this album, but ultimately it’s a Southern rock record in the very best tradition of a nearly forgotten genre. “Houston County Sky” channels The Marshall Tucker Band, and “Little More Money” and “Bad Weather” are right out of Dirty South-era Drive By Truckers. “Hammer” is a sultry, swampy reminiscence of early Black Crowes. This album is a triumph, and long-awaited.

4. Jason Hawk Harris – Love And The Dark

Bloodshot continues its hot streak of great debut records. Harris endured an unimaginable series of tragedies in the few years leading up to this album, yet managed to emerge with clarity and hopefulness. He’s a brilliant songwriter who also deserves legitimate Isbell comparisons.

5. Ian Noe – Between The Country

This guy. He writes this generation’s “Sam Stone,” about every other cut. Born for this time, in this day’s Kentucky. The sad, hard truth, from the guy who’s been milling it for a good, long while.

6. Charles Wesley Godwin – Seneca
Godwin paints a rich and honest portrayal of his homeland and its people with his debut album. Seneca is a moving snapshot of life and well-soiled roots in the Appalachian hills, a backdrop that has given birth to some of the most intelligent and hard-working people in the country.

7. Kelsey Waldon – White Noise/White Lines

A tough, touring gal posts up with an album and band that shows John Prine was right to sign her to O Boy Records. It’s dreamy and trippy and wonderful, and she’s so full of confidence. Kelsey Waldon will amaze.

8. Drivin N Cryin – Live The Love Beautiful

The band’s first full-length album in a decade, it’s a top-4 or-5 in the all-time catalog. Kevn and the band are comfortable in their skin, three decades in. And Trailer was right to put “Ian MacLagan” in his top songs of the year.

9. Chris Knight – Almost Daylight

A couple of things about the fact that all the great Chris Knight songs sound alike: They all rock, they’re all true. And he only puts albums out about every five years. Wait. That’s three things. I don’t care. He’s William Freaking Callahan.

10. Flatland Cavalry – Homeland Insecurity

Building on 2016’s Humble Folks – a fantastic album – this one is well-enough produced to ask if Flatland might crack the mainstream. Maybe this could be a “crossover” act that could win converts?


Sep 19, 2019

The Princess Bride Country Reaction Gifs

When somebody says their favorite 'country' singer is Thomas Rhett

What's the best way to listen to an Old Dominion song?

Patiently listening to country radio to hear a country song

If you're a hick-hop fan expecting people to respect your taste

You don't like Charles Wesley Godwin?

When your office-mate is already playing Kane Brown when you get to work at 8

Highwomen had the #1 country album?

When my wife says they were playing bro-country in the store the whole time she was there and I laugh.

"Hell Right, Hell Right"

Aug 16, 2019

Live Review / Ward Davis & Charles Wesley Godwin / Pearl Street Warehouse 8/9/19


By Matthew Martin

To be honest, I had only really just heard of Ward Davis.  I knew that he was a helluva songwriter and was always being lauded by Cody Jinks.  I knew that he was a co-writer of one of my favorite Jinks songs, "I'm Not The Devil."  But, I wasn't really familiar with his music.  But, when I saw that the incredible Charles Wesley Godwin was going to be opening up for him, I knew I was going to go.  Then, they switched up the show and made it a free show.  That made it even better.  So, we got some friends together and went to Pearl Street Warehouse in D.C.'s newly updated Wharf area.  

To start the evening, Ward Davis's bassist (whose name I did not write down and cannot remember for the life of me) started with a few songs.  Here I will admit that I could not hear the songs that well.  The acoustics this evening at Pearl Street Warehouse left much to be desired.  There was an open window in the back which may have resulted in the solo musician being drowned out by the voices inside and outside of the bar.  The songs were fine enough, but I just couldn't hear them well enough to have a strong opinion one way or the other.

Next, Charles Wesley Godwin was up and while the mix was also still a little messed up in the bar, the songs still stood out.  I know I mentioned this before, but I think CWG is special.  I think this debut solo album is special.  I think the stories CWG tells of West Virginia are important for everyone to hear.  We hear country songs about beer, women, and backroads enough.  We don't hear what it's like for real, honest country folks living their lives through the ups and downs of wars and energy industry downturns.  That being said, I did have the advantage to lots of folks (but, not all, for sure) in that I knew most of the songs and was able to make the sounds I couldn't quite hear out in my head.  This was nothing against CWG, mind you.  He sang his heart out, he played his heart out.  It's just the sound at the venue was very much off this night for a solo act.  However, that didn't stop folks from loving what they were hearing.  Some who were talking quite loudly during the first act shut up immediately to try and strain and hear every word coming from the stage.  I found out shortly after that there were a few people who had driven 3 hours to come see CWG open for Ward Davis.  That is special, y'all.  I remember hearing stories like that about American Aquarium.  CWG has struck a chord and his momentum will continue to grow.

Finally, Ward Davis was up.  He's a heavy-hitter.  He's pure country gold.  He's honky tonk.  He's everything I wanted to hear.  He started the night off on his trusty telecaster, slinging out classics like "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way" to his collaboration with Cody Jinks "I'm Not The Devil."  His band was tight.  The sound that was plaguing the first two acts didn't quite plague Davis as the band was able to drown out a lot of the chatter and really wash over folks.  Speaking of the band, the guitarist was great.  He hit every note like a seasoned veteran and he looked like he couldn't be a day over 21.  Midway through the set Davis switched over to his piano and played some more introspective tunes which included his songs from his latest EP Asunder.  The sincerity and simplicity with which Davis tells a story is stunning.  The range he has as a musician- storytelling-wise, I mean- is something to behold.  He can throw down shit-kicking boot-stompers or he can lay down beautiful heartbreaking tunes about divorce.  Not to mention, he can cover a song like "Time To Move On" by Tom Petty and make it sound like it's his own song.  He was impressive by all measures.  I was disappointed to know that he only has 1 full album and 1 EP out there.  I want, no need, more music from Ward Davis.  His peers (Jinks, Whitey Morgan) are putting out incredible music at a breakneck pace these days.  He can add to that and bring his own unique sound and style to the table.

As always, if you see these folks coming anywhere near you, go see them.  Go give em a hug.  Go buy anything and everything you can from them.  They are making music that deserves to be heard and they deserve every ounce of success they get from their hard work.  


(Not from the Pearl Street Warehouse show)

Jun 28, 2019

Top 25 Albums of 2019: 1st Half Report


This is Trailer’s top 25. The year-end list will be a collaborative effort from FTM contributors.


1. Vandoliers - Forever

2. Ian Noe - Between the Country

3. Molly Tuttle - When You’re Ready

4. Tyler Ramsey - For the Morning

5. Baroness - Gold and Grey

6. Austin Meade - Waves

7. Caroline Spence - Mint Condition

8. Dee White - Southern Gentleman

9. Charles Wesley Godwin - Seneca

10. Kalyn Fay - Good Company

11. Reba McEntire - Stronger Than the Truth

12. Joshua Ray Walker - Wish You Were Here

13. Emily Scott Robinson - Traveling Mercies

14. Yola - Walk Through Fire

14. Flatland Cavalry - Homeland Insecurity

16. Randy Rogers Band - Hellbent

17. Jenny Lewis - On the Line

18. Rod Melancon - Pinkville

19. Mary Bragg - Violets as Camouflage

20. Quaker City Night Hawks - QCNH

21. George Strait - Honky Tonk Time Machine

22. Karly Driftwood - Too Mean to Die

23. Jade Bird - s/t

24. Randy Houser - Magnolia

25. Sharon Van Etten - Remind Me Tomorrow

Apr 9, 2019

Top Albums of 2019 - First Quarter Report



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1. Vandoliers - Forever

2. Charles Wesley Godwin - Seneca

3. Joshua Ray Walker - Wish You Were Here

4. Molly Tuttle - When You’re Ready

5. Austin Meade - Waves

6. Kalyn Fay - Good Company

7. Dee White - Southern Gentleman

8. Jenny Lewis - On the Line

9. Yola - Walk Through Fire

10. Flatland Cavalry - Homeland Insecurity

11. Robert Ellis - Texas Piano Man

12. Reba McEntire - Stronger Than the Truth

13. Mary Bragg - Violets as Camouflage

14. Rod Melancon - Pinkville

15. Quaker City Night Hawks - QCNH

16. Sharon Van Etten - Remind Me Tomorrow

17. George Strait - Honky Tonk Time Machine

18. Hayes Carll - What It Is

19. Karly Driftwood - Too Mean to Die

20. Jimbo Mathus - Incinerator

21. Liz Brasher - Painted Image

22. Charlie Shafter - When I Was Yours and You Were Mine

23. Randy Houser - Magnolia

24. The Steel Woods - Old News

25. Rob Baird - After All

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*there are a few recent and forthcoming albums I haven't listened to enough to rank yet

**this is just Trailer's top 25 - year end list will include all FTM contributors

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