Showing posts with label Grand Ole Opry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Grand Ole Opry. Show all posts

Oct 26, 2021

Exclusive Video Premiere / Bill Filipiak / “When the Blues Come Calling”

Photo by Kristi Filipiak

Today we have a video premiere just perfect for the ‘holiday season.’ Rootsy bluesman (and Grand Ole Opry producer) Bill Filipiak brings us the ghoulish visuals for “When the Blues Come Calling.” It’s a direct and gritty pondering of blues music’s favorite topic… the blues. Here, depression is symbolized by the relentless pursuit of the undead, thanks to cuts from the zombie masterpiece Night of the Living Dead. Filipiak’s warm and worn vocals and the creeping resonator guitar add to the haunting atmosphere. RIYL: Ray Wylie Hubbard, Tim Easton, Robert Cray.


The song is from Bill’s recent release Medicine I Need. Links and bio information below the video!




Bill Filipiak - Medicine I Need 

(streaming links - all major platforms)

https://lnk.to/SvnMv8Ow


Bill - Website & socials:

https://www.filipiak.com/

https://www.facebook.com/billfilipiakmusic

https://www.instagram.com/billfilipiak/

https://open.spotify.com/artist/2xdtTND1CviwJbO8j2wvpM

https://twitter.com/billfilipiak

https://www.youtube.com/billfilipiak


BILL FILIPIAK - MEDICINE I NEED


As a producer for the most hallowed of Nashville roots-music institutions, the Grand Ole Opry, Bill Filipiak has had a chance to not only brush elbows with, but really get to know and learn from, some of the finest Americana artists around. Which, of course, has been a major influence on his own work. With his latest—and most fully realized—record to date, Filipiak taps the inspiration and wisdom of these artists, honing his lifelong passion for music and songwriting into an impressive, thoughtful and healing folk-blues journey, the aptly titled Medicine I Need.


“When you have the opportunity to talk songwriting with these people and watch them perform—I’m talking about folks like Larkin Poe, Sarah Jarosz, Molly Tuttle, Bryan Sutton and Allison Russell; artists like Lera Lynn and Maggie Rose, who insist on finding their own path while staying true to who they are; or maybe you spend a couple days with a legend like Keb Mo, George Thorogood or Ray Wylie Hubbard—after that,” Filipiak says, “it's hard not to pick up your instrument, try to emulate what they've done, then come up with your own idea and follow through on it.”

And that’s exactly what Filipiak has done with Medicine I Need (out Oct. 1). The album—his third full-length—features a unique palette: the gritty blues power of a Gretsch Honey Dipper resonator guitar, mellowed by a splash of Beach Boys surf and a healthy dose of Wurlitzer electric piano. Filipiak—who recorded, engineered, produced and played every sound you hear on this singular vision of a record—simmers these ingredients into a potent and satisfying stew of downhome country-blues, folk and Americana.


“I'm a rhythm guitarist,” Filipiak says. “For me it’s all about finding a groove, and that’s where the Honey Dipper comes in. Getting my hands on that guitar really turned the tables for me. It was a sound I’d been wanting for years—the rough, raw, hollow sound of a resonator. I started learning slide for this album, and from there the riffs and songs just started flowing. Around the same time, my son got into the Beach Boys—Brian Wilson and that echoing electric surf-guitar sound. I started experimenting with it as a backdrop, then I brought in the Wurlitzer as a counterpoint to balance the edge of the resonator, and it all started to meld.”


Much of it written in the throes of the pandemic," Medicine I Need’s title and subject matter were driven by the deep introspection of quarantine. “I think covid brought all these feelings and realizations to the forefront,” Filipiak says. “We rarely slow down, and we’re often overwhelmed. I think as a culture, we learned a lot about the need to take a step back and look inside, about giving ourselves time to recharge, and that it's okay to be alone sometimes, which gives us a chance to learn about ourselves.”


For Filipiak—who lost his mother last year, his father five years ago, and his brother-in-law just before that—the reflective time, the powerful medicine of solitude, was much needed. He wrote sweet, heartfelt Americana ballad “My Prayer” as a tribute to his mother, and shell-shocked blues shuffle “Fearing the Dawn” about coping with the reality-shaking revelations that came in the wake of his Father’s death. “Looking back at all the things that happened with my family the last five or six years,” Filipiak says, “there was a lot I needed to work through. This new album gave me the opportunity to do that.”


Family is an essential part of Medicine I Need, and not just the grief and loss. To balance it, there’s the encouragement Bill received from his wife Kristi to make the record, and the inspiration and influence of his five kids—their passion for music and the arts, their zest for life; one daughter’s ideas about the importance of personal space even became a key lyrical focus on Medicine. And most directly, there’s Bill’s collaboration with his sister-in-law, poet Kara V. Leinfelder, who provided the lyrics for “Hope in Your Heart” as well as the album’s title track. “I love Kara’s writing,” Filipiak says. “A couple of her poems really spoke to what I was trying to accomplish with the overall theme of the record, which was, ‘Yeah, the blues are coming, and it's just part of life.’ We all want to be happy all the time, but that's just not reality. And she also touched beautifully on the idea of healing your heart through solitude. Introspection—it’s how we combat the blues. We embrace them and acknowledge they're a part of who we are and what life is about. But we also look for ways to encourage ourselves and find the positive.”


Throughout his journey, music has always been a constant for Filipiak. As a kid, he was obsessed with the eclectic set of 45-rpm vinyl singles he inherited from his older sisters—records by the Stones & Small Faces, Bubble Puppy & The Strawberry Alarm Clock, Willie Nelson & Waylon Jennings and so many others. A natural, young Bill learned the piano by ear at age three, and went on to play keys and guitar in bands throughout high school and college. “As long as I can remember, I was just enamored with music,” he says. “My sister was playing The Doors’ ‘Hello, I Love You,’ I heard it and that was my first word—“hello.” Most kids sleep with their stuffed animals—I slept with my records. I still have them to this day.”


When he finally struck out on his own, Bill ended up working in radio, including a stint recreating popular tracks piece-by-piece for on-air parodies, an excellent musical education. Years down the road, as his career in the industry took off, he began producing music videos for Americana artists. It put him on the path to his current gig at the Opry, and to the music he’s been making as a solo artist since the laidback blues-folk of his 2016 debut, Put the Top Down, and 2020’s roots-centric Brand New Me. Now, with the blues-injected Medicine I Need, Filipiak, 55, continues his creative journey in earnest.


“I have such profound respect for the artists I work with—how dedicated they are to their craft,” he says. “I learn something every day being around them. You know, Allison Russell released her first solo album at 41, and Ray Wylie Hubbard made his Opry debut at 72—even in their later years, they’re still achieving new goals and putting themselves out there. And that’s motivation for me. Plus, my kids are all brilliant and creative, and I want them to see that I’m still pursuing this thing that feeds my soul. You’ve got to keep that fire alive. When I was growing up working on our dairy farm with my Dad, whenever we’d be digging or cutting or lifting something, he’d always say, ‘C’mon, just one more push.’ He said it all the time. And through my life it has reverberated in my head. ‘One more push’—it all comes back to this idea that the blues can keep knocking us down, but if we embrace them, and learn from them, and recognize how strong we can be, the blues can become the fuel we need to keep moving forward.”


Aug 28, 2019

This Guy Rants About Cody Jinks Playing the Opry

LMOA! Who! When I heard last year that my boy Dustin Lynch was joining the Grand Old Opera I was happy as hell! For all he’s done for country music, it was about damn time! He makes music that makes chicks want to ride in my truck with me and that means he a legend! 

Now comes word that somebody name Cody Jinks is playing at the opery tonight. Cody Jinks, who’s she? LOL. Now I’m not a hater but shouldn’t people that plays the hollow hall of country music be somebody me and my bros have listen to? I mean, back in the olden days, they let people play who only did sad songs played with old timey instruments like guitars and fiddles, but in more recent years, they’s let my homie Hootie join and Dustin and folks like that. Party ass music, you know what I’m sayin?

I asked all are friend’s group if they’d heard of Cody Jinks and here was the results: Chad said “Who tf is that?” (Yes he really said “tf” out loud). Brad said “Is that the guy who used to date Brelynn?” Matt said “No.” Dylan said “I don’t listen to anybody who doesn’t have DJ in front of there name.” Only Carter said he’s heard of Cody, but Carter runs a blog or something and he’s pretty weird. 

There’s a thousand country singers who deserve to be on the Opary before Cody Junks. Like Mitchell Tenpenny. That dude slaps. Diplo! F**k yeah, he’s done two or three country songs everybody I know loves. Marshmello. He did that song with Kane Brown and he’s legit. I could go on for pair of graphs, but you get the point. 

I listened to a Cody Jinks song and I couldn’t even get threw thirty seconds before I wanted to attach a garden hose to my F-150 exhaust in the garage. Why dose anyone want to hear such sad songs and songs about grown ass adult stuff? That’s so boring. Give me real country dudes singing about stuff I knows about like hooking up in bars and hooking up in bars. 

Anyway, I’m probably never going to the Grand Old Oprery anyway because theirs some guy who plays there all the time named Ricky Skanks, and I’d just laugh the hole time.


Mar 8, 2019

Some Guy You've Never Heard of Makes Opry Debut

by Trailer - Originally posted on Country California, March 01, 2012 

Some country singer you have never heard of, much less heard any music from, makes his Opry debut Friday night. 

Hailing from a fond-memory-inducing podunk on the Kentucky horizon, the random male country performer reportedly grew up listening to the Opry on the radio. He also visited the Opry several times, and idolized quite a few artists who graced that stage. He also wears a cowboy hat and customized leather belts. 

Whoever this guy is released his debut single in late December and has seen it rise steadily into the lower 30s on the charts. Tall, blue-eyed, and handsome, the unidentified singer is said to possess a vocal style reminiscent of that one guy with the tight jeans. 

Nondescript vocalist guy is currently in the studio with an in-demand hit producer and the engineer of several forgettably popular recent releases. The tepid - but commercially viable - debut album, with a cover photo of the dude standing in front of a weathered brick wall, is expected to be released in early summer. 

This person's Opry debut will be on a bill with Mel Tillis and Montgomery Gentry as well as a high school glee club and a token bluegrass band. 

At press time, a rumor was swirling that there may be a major announcement or invitation of some sort for this featureless, though quite fetching, country music singer when he takes the stage. 



Mar 6, 2019

NOW That's What I Call Opry!


In honor of Kelsea Ballerini's invitation to join the Grand Ole Opry last night, the Opry has today announced the release of NOW That's What I Call Opry! Awesome!




Aug 24, 2018

Dustin Lynch Inducted Into Pro Football Hall of Fame

Despite never having playing in the NFL, singer Dustin Lynch was recently inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Lynch smartly donned his gold jacket and ring at the enshrinement ceremony and gave a rousing acceptance speech.

"It is such a great honor to stand alongside the giants of this sport I wasn't involved with and walk in the shadows of the legends." said Lynch, beaming his million dollar smile. "Jerry Rice, Joe Montana, Lawrence Taylor… I can't believe my name and bust will be displayed in the company of such unforgettable talent. I may not have ever thrown a pass, participated in a single training camp, or even held that wire water tray thingie, but I gladly accept this completely unjustifiable recognition." 

Attendees of the ceremony looked befuddled, but remained respectful as Lynch thanked all the people who hadn't helped him become a renowned football player. Randy Moss and Brian Urlacher cast confused glances at one another repeatedly through the speech, while Brian Dawkins kept shrugging and rolling his eyes. 

Though Lynch has not laced up football pants since the 8th grade, the Hall of Fame believed him worthy for reasons unbeknownst to anyone but the board. Dustin's career football stats as a middle school running back were rather subpar. He boasted 204 total yards on 94 carries, one touchdown, and seven fumbles. 

Still, Lynch feels he will be a valuable asset to the Hall. "I have strong appeal with young women and teen girls, so I hope to bring more eyes to this great sport that I never took part in." he told us. 

Lynch was recently asked to become a member of the Grand Ole Opry, Nashville's hallowed hall of country music, despite being a pop singer, so gaining undeserved honors seems to be his thing. 

Terrell Owens had no comment on Lynch's induction.


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